News Archive - 2006

News Archive - 2006

Antibiotic Resistance Advance in Asia

Antibiotic Resistance Advance in Asia

Growing Resistance of Paratyphoid Fever Bacterium

In a study published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, a team led by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute highlights the need for effective diagnosis of paratyphoid fever to postpone the increase in antibiotic resistance and to defend against the loss of confidence in vaccination programmes.

Identity Swap

Identity Swap

Finding the variants that human history has favoured

Sequence differences in less than 0.2 per cent of the three-billion-base human genome play a vital role in a bewildering variety of human disease. Today, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the Cambridge University's Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, together with international colleagues report in PLoS Genetics their detailed maps of differences implicated in disease as well as genes that are unchanged in recent human history.

UnMASCing Machines in the Brain

UnMASCing Machines in the Brain

Uncovering the molecular networks at the basis of cognition

In a report published online on Wednesday 18 January in Molecular Systems Biology, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Edinburgh show that the proteins that comprise the synapse form a complex and densely connected molecular network. This novel model of a molecular network presents a new way to understand how information is processed in the brain and how mental illnesses arise.

Around the World in 800 Billion Bases

Around the World in 800 Billion Bases

Sanger Institute Genetic Records are World's Biggest

On Tuesday 17 January 2006 the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's World Trace Archive database of DNA sequences hit one billion entries. The Trace Archive is a store of all the sequence data produced and published by the world scientific community, including the Sanger Institute's own prodigious output as a world-leading genomics institution.

International Partnership to Sequence the Pig Genome

International Partnership to Sequence the Pig Genome

Two-year $10 million project

The two-year project will lead to the development of new DNA-based tools to identify and select breeds of pig that resist infectious diseases and produce leaner cuts of meat for consumers. There is an increasing need to improve overall pig husbandry in terms of health, welfare and sustainability, as well as traceability, food quality and safety.

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