Dr Julian Rayner

Julian's lab investigates the molecular details of human-parasite interactions during the P. falciparum blood stages, with a particular focus on genomic and proteomic approaches to understanding erythrocyte invasion.

Julian graduated from Lincoln University in New Zealand in 1993 with a degree in Biochemistry. He then moved to the UK to work as a graduate student in Dr Hugh Pelham's lab at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge.

In Hugh's lab, Julian worked on membrane protein targeting in yeast and received his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 1998. While looking for a new research field to study as a post-doc, Julian stumbled across a review written by Dr John Barnwell describing how the major human malaria pathogen, Plasmodium falciparum, invades human erythrocytes. Erythrocyte invasion is a fascinating and still largely unexplained cell biological process that is an essential step in both parasite survival and malaria pathogenesis. Julian was hooked. From 1998 to 2002 he studied as a post-doctoral research fellow in John Barnwell's lab at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, where he helped identify and characterise a new family of P. falciparum ligands involved in erythrocyte recognition. In 2002, Julian became a faculty member in the Department of Medicine at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, where his team worked on the molecular details of how P. falciparum parasites recognise and invade human erythrocytes, and established strong links to field studies in the Peruvian Amazon.

Julian joined the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Malaria Programme in 2008. The Sanger Institute's Malaria Programme uses genomic and genetic approaches to discover molecular mechanisms of host-parasite interactions that may lead to new biological insights and improved strategies for disease prevention. Julian's lab investigates the molecular details of human-parasite interactions during the P. falciparum blood stages, with a particular focus on genomic and proteomic approaches to understanding erythrocyte invasion.

Selected Publications

  • Basigin is a receptor essential for erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum.

    Crosnier C, Bustamante LY, Bartholdson SJ, Bei AK, Theron M, Uchikawa M, Mboup S, Ndir O, Kwiatkowski DP, Duraisingh MT, Rayner JC and Wright GJ

    Nature 2011;480;7378;534-7

  • A scalable pipeline for highly effective genetic modification of a malaria parasite.

    Pfander C, Anar B, Schwach F, Otto TD, Brochet M, Volkmann K, Quail MA, Pain A, Rosen B, Skarnes W, Rayner JC and Billker O

    Nature methods 2011;8;12;1078-82

  • A plethora of Plasmodium species in wild apes: a source of human infection?

    Rayner JC, Liu W, Peeters M, Sharp PM and Hahn BH

    Trends in parasitology 2011;27;5;222-9

  • Malaria immunoepidemiology in low transmission: correlation of infecting genotype and immune response to domains of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 3.

    Jordan SJ, Oliveira AL, Hernandez JN, Oster RA, Chattopadhyay D, Branch OH and Rayner JC

    Infection and immunity 2011;79;5;2070-8

  • An adaptable two-color flow cytometric assay to quantitate the invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodium falciparum parasites.

    Theron M, Hesketh RL, Subramanian S and Rayner JC

    Cytometry. Part A : the journal of the International Society for Analytical Cytology 2010;77;11;1067-74

  • Origin of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in gorillas.

    Liu W, Li Y, Learn GH, Rudicell RS, Robertson JD, Keele BF, Ndjango JB, Sanz CM, Morgan DB, Locatelli S, Gonder MK, Kranzusch PJ, Walsh PD, Delaporte E, Mpoudi-Ngole E, Georgiev AV, Muller MN, Shaw GM, Peeters M, Sharp PM, Rayner JC and Hahn BH

    Nature 2010;467;7314;420-5

  • Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte invasion: a conserved myosin associated complex.

    Jones ML, Kitson EL and Rayner JC

    Molecular and biochemical parasitology 2006;147;1;74-84

  • Evolution of human-chimpanzee differences in malaria susceptibility: relationship to human genetic loss of N-glycolylneuraminic acid.

    Martin MJ, Rayner JC, Gagneux P, Barnwell JW and Varki A

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2005;102;36;12819-24

  • A Plasmodium falciparum homologue of Plasmodium vivax reticulocyte binding protein (PvRBP1) defines a trypsin-resistant erythrocyte invasion pathway.

    Rayner JC, Vargas-Serrato E, Huber CS, Galinski MR and Barnwell JW

    The Journal of experimental medicine 2001;194;11;1571-81

  • Two Plasmodium falciparum genes express merozoite proteins that are related to Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium yoelii adhesive proteins involved in host cell selection and invasion.

    Rayner JC, Galinski MR, Ingravallo P and Barnwell JW

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2000;97;17;9648-53

[Wellcome Library, London]

Julian's Project
Malaria Programme
Research Area
Pathogen Genetics
Email
jr9@sanger.ac.uk
* quick link - http://q.sanger.ac.uk/x0bzavh3