News Archive

News Archive

The finished human genome

The finished human genome

The "Gold Standard" sequence

The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, of which the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a major partner, today published their scientific analysis of the finished human genome, the Gold Standard sequence that is already acting to prime new biomedical research.

A Switch for Lung Cancer

A Switch for Lung Cancer

Gene Mutation suggests Targeted Treatments

One in five people in the developed world will die of the diseases we call cancer. What they die of is not one disease, but a bewildering array of cancers, each of which behaves differently, grows differently and - crucially - responds to treatment differently.

Getting a Grip on the Great Mimicker

Getting a Grip on the Great Mimicker

Secrets of a Stealth Organism

Living amongst the roots of tropical plants is a soil bacterium with the unwieldy name Burkholderia pseudomallei - or often 'The Great Mimicker'. This organism can cause blood disease, abscesses, lung disease, kidney disease, heart disease and more. In some areas of the world, half of teenagers with blood infections die. Sometimes it lays dormant for years before striking.

MICER: a resource to help understand disease

MICER: a resource to help understand disease

Making sense of the mouse genome

With the sequencing of the mouse genome at The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and other centres nearing completion, an extensive and increasingly accurate catalogue of mouse genes is available. The mouse gene set will work to help us understand the function of human genes in health and disease.

Superbug's Pick'n'Mix DNA

Superbug's Pick'n'Mix DNA

UK MRSA genome decoded

Today (24 June 2004), researchers from The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their colleagues announce the completion of the genome sequence of an MRSA strain and its antibiotic-sensitive 'cousin' MSSA. The strain of MRSA chosen, which causes half of all UK outbreaks, contains several unique genetic elements that are related to its virulence and drug resistance. It has emerged as a major threat in only the past ten years.

Richard Durbin, Deputy Director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Elected to the Royal Society

Richard Durbin, Deputy Director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Elected to the Royal Society

Dr Richard Durbin, Deputy Director of The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has been elected to a Fellowship of the UK's most prestigious scientific organization, the Royal Society.

Dr Durbin is a leading expert in bioinformatics - using computers and software to understand biological process. Ten years ago, the largest available genome sequences were viruses with a few hundred thousand DNA bases. Today, we have many genomes - including human - that contain billions of bases. Sophisticated computational tools are needed to help researchers make use of all this information. A leading example is the Ensembl genome browser, developed by Durbin's team, which receives approaching 1 million hits each week.

One-tenth of our genome in one day: from sequence to disease to evolution

One-tenth of our genome in one day: from sequence to disease to evolution

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute decodes human chromosome 9 and 10

In two landmark reports published today in Nature (27th May 2004), researchers from Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators announce the findings of their study of the finished sequence of human chromosomes 9 and 10. Together, these chromosomes comprise one-tenth of our human genome.

Number 13 - unlucky for genes?

Number 13 - unlucky for genes?

Latest chromosome analysis reveals the variety in our genome

Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute today (Thursday 1 April 2004) describe their studies of human chromosome 13 (published in Nature). Among the genes identified using the sequence of chromosome 13 are those that can dispose to breast cancer (BRCA2) as well as regions associated with schizophrenia and one containing a gene implicated in asthma.

COSMIC assault on cancer

COSMIC assault on cancer

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute launches Catalogue Of Somatic Mutations In Cancer

In the quest to develop rational approaches to treating cancer, researchers need efficient access to existing knowledge. COSMIC (Catalogue Of Somatic Mutations In Cancer), which is launched on Wednesday 4 February by the Cancer Genome Project at The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, is a new tool that provides integrated genetic data from cancer genes, and will make research faster and easier.

Mapping A Road To Understanding Human Health

Mapping A Road To Understanding Human Health

International HapMap Project Starts the Cartography of Human Genome Variation

The quest to track down genes involved in health and disease and our response to treatments is a long and difficult challenge. Today (18th December 2003), in the journal Nature, the International HapMap Consortium, to which The Wellcome Trust is a major contributor, describes important new tools it will produce to enhance our use of the human genome sequence and to fast-track that quest.

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