News Archive

News Archive

Of mice and men - First phase of mouse genome sequencing project completed

Of mice and men - First phase of mouse genome sequencing project completed

Publicly Available Data Expected to Speed Medical Discovery

The Mouse Sequencing Consortium (MSC), announced today (Tuesday 8th May 2001) that it has completed the first phase of reading the mouse 'book of life', reaching its goal on time and within budget.

Wellcome Trust promotes open door policy of human genome treasure chest

Wellcome Trust promotes open door policy of human genome treasure chest

"World's biggest free gift is still a secret"

Biomedical research charity the Wellcome Trust today (Thursday 26th April 2001) launches an advertising campaign to promote the public human genome databases, including the UK-based Ensembl service, which receives the majority of its funding from the Trust. Widespread access to the public human genome databases is essential if the Human Genome Project sequence is to be translated into healthcare benefits, says the Trust

Leprosy genome shows massive gene decay

Leprosy genome shows massive gene decay

Leprosy - the enigmatic scourge

There are nearly 700,000 new cases of leprosy each year. However, doctors don't fully understand how leprosy spreads and cannot grow it in the laboratory. New research published today in Nature magazine reveals that the organism that causes leprosy may have manoeuvred itself into an evolutionary cul-de-sac.

Comparison of draft human sequence versions from the public and private domain

Comparison of draft human sequence versions from the public and private domain

Now that the papers from the two teams can be inspected, we can for the first time judge the relative quality of the two versions and the strengths of the methods employed the different initiatives: mapping and finishing process (public) and pure whole genome shotgun (private).

The greater part of the data for Celera's assemblies comes from the public Human Genome Project (HGP). Despite this benefit, Celera's assembly is only comparable with that of the public HGP and is dependent upon it. This suggests that pure whole genome shotgun has failed as far as generating the sequence of the human genome is concerned.

British science targets nearly half of world's genetic diseases

British science targets nearly half of world's genetic diseases

British scientists are helping the world to understand four out of 10 of known genetic diseases, such as cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease.

Currently 39% of all the disease genes found have been discovered on "British" chromosomes. There are 24 chromosomes in the human body, and eight of these are being sequenced (that is, genetically read) by researchers at the Sanger Institute, at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus near Cambridge.

Human Genome Project shows the wonder and the mystery of humankind

Human Genome Project shows the wonder and the mystery of humankind

"It has not escaped our notice that the more we learn about the human genome, the more there is to explore."- Conclusion to the human genome sequencing paper

The publication today (11 February 2001) of the detailed sequencing and mapping papers of the Human Genome Project shows that the "book of humankind" is even more wonderful, and mysterious, than previously thought.

Dr John Sulston Knighted in the New Year Honours list

Dr John Sulston Knighted in the New Year Honours list

Dr John Sulston, former Director of the Sanger Centre, was awarded a knighthood for services to genome research in the New Year Honours list.

Dr Sulston was instrumental in establishing the Sanger Centre and, with the backing of the Wellcome Trust, built the Centre into one of the world's premier genomics centres. Today, the Sanger Centre is responsible for sequencing one-third of the human genome, the genomes of dozens of disease-causing organisms, as well as providing annotation - that is interpreting the DNA code.

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