News Archive

News Archive

International Team of Researchers Assembles Draft Sequence of Mouse Genome

International Team of Researchers Assembles Draft Sequence of Mouse Genome

Ninety-six percent of mouse genome sequenced; Results freely available in public databases on Internet

This achievement represents a major milestone for the Human Genome Project because it provides a key tool needed to interpret the human sequence, a draft version of which was published last year. Researchers will be better able to understand the function of many human genes because the mouse carries virtually the same set of genes as the human but can be used in laboratory research.

Wellcome Trust Proposal To Extend Genome Campus

Wellcome Trust Proposal To Extend Genome Campus

The proposal will extend the leading genome centre to include a post-genomic research facility for academic and industry scientists.

The proposed extension will provide cutting-edge academic research facilities for the Sanger Institute as it progresses from sequencing the human genome to discovering what genes do. It will also include an Innovation Centre for genomics start-up companies and space for grow-on companies seeking to expand.

MHC Haplotype Consortium Web Resource

MHC Haplotype Consortium Web Resource

A Cambridge-based Consortium today announced a new web resource designed to help medical researchers in the fight against diseases like diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

The MHC Haplotype Consortium - formed by researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge - will define the most common differences in DNA code that can lead to these diseases. An accurate molecular understanding should lead to improved diagnosis and treatment.

The complete genome of Mycobacterium bovis has been sequenced

The complete genome of Mycobacterium bovis has been sequenced

A step forward in the fight against bovine tuberculosis: The complete genome of Mycobacterium bovis has been sequenced

The sequencing project has revealed that the genome of M. bovis is greater than 99.9% identical to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, which kills over two million people a year. Analysis of the two genomes has revealed an unexpected evolutionary scenario for the development of these two pathogens. Since the M. bovis genome is smaller than that of M. tuberculosis, it is more likely that man gave tuberculosis to cattle or that the two organisms evolved separately from a common ancestor.

Humble yeast to help tackle cancer

Humble yeast to help tackle cancer

A British-led international team of scientists has broken the genetic code of fission yeast, a development which is likely to have major implications for the future of cancer and bio-medical research.

In today's Nature (Thursday 21 February 2002), Dr Paul Nurse, who is Joint Director General of Cancer Research UK, and Dr Bart Barrell and Val Wood from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, report their analysis of the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). Fifty of the yeast genes were found to have significant similarity with genes involved in human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, hereditary deafness and non insulin dependent diabetes, and half were found to be cancer related.

Dermatitis, Diabetes, Dementia:

Dermatitis, Diabetes, Dementia:

Chromosome 20 Gives up its Secrets

A treasure trove for biomedical science, chromosome 20 contains nearly 60 million DNA "letters", and more than 720 genes - less than half of which have been fully characterized. An intriguing discovery is that the sequence also shows that two in five of us have an extra 'chunk' of DNA. This region appears to be an 'insertion' and contains at least one gene.

Typhoid fever bug sequence raises hope of complete eradication

Typhoid fever bug sequence raises hope of complete eradication

Scientists from Britain, Denmark and Vietnam have deciphered the genetic code of the bacterium responsible for typhoid fever, Salmonella typhi.

Their achievement, reported in the magazine Nature today, raises hope for the prospects of completely eradicating typhoid, which currently claims 600,000 lives a year globally.

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute moves to new era

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute moves to new era

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, one of the world's leading centres for genome research, announced its new five-year £300 million research programme.

The new post-genomic period builds on the Institute's groundbreaking work in sequencing the human genome. In addition, genomes from tens of disease-causing organisms (pathogens), including the malaria parasite, are being sequenced. Teams of scientists at the Institute will now determine how genes build and control the human body. They will also study the roles that human and pathogen genomes play in health and disease.

Black Death unveiled

Black Death unveiled

The bacterium which causes plague, which once killed millions throughout Europe, has been sequenced by a team of scientists backed by funding from the Wellcome Trust biomedical research charity.

Completion of the Yersinia pestis sequencing will hopefully allow researchers to develop more drugs to combat the disease, which is still prevalent in some parts of the world. One vaccine produced at the Ministry of Defence's Porton Down establishment is already undergoing trials.

Top international award for British genome champion

Top international award for British genome champion

Sir John Sulston, former Director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Centre which carried out the United Kingdom contribution to the international Human Genome Project, will receive the Prince Asturia's Award for Scientific and Technical Research.

The award means that Sir John will receive five million pesetas (£18,000), a special Joan Miró sculpture, a diploma and insignia. The awards will be presented on 26 October in Oviedo in Spain at a ceremony presided over by HRH the Prince of Asturias.

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