News Archive

News Archive

Deletion, Duplication and Detail

Deletion, Duplication and Detail

Uncovering Variation in the Human Genomes

In a major new development, published in the American Journal of Human Genetics on Monday April 4, 2005, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and colleagues describe a new method called 'Exon Array CGH' (comparative genome hybridization) to detect loss or gain of DNA regions across the genome using a DNA 'chip' or array method.

What Sex did to the X - and Why

What Sex did to the X - and Why

A chromosome account of evolution and revolution

On Thursday 17 March 2005, an international team led by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, UK publishes in Nature the most complete analysis of this remarkable chromosome. The landmark study shows how we got an X chromosome and how it has been preserved (while the Y chromosome has degenerated). It also identifies new genes involved in disease and provides a gold-standard platform for studies to understand, to diagnose and, it is hoped, to treat a huge range of human disease.

Genome centres combine forces to validate a gene set for biomedical research

Genome centres combine forces to validate a gene set for biomedical research

Consensus CoDing Sequence - CCDS

Online databases to access the human genome have been a boon to biomedical research, and the usefulness of this information has just moved to a new level. Today researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), both at Hinxton Cambridge, together with colleagues at the University of California, Santa Cruz and the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) in the US have released the results of a project to identify a core set of genes that can be located on the genome and validated as coding for proteins.

DNA of the tissue destroyer

DNA of the tissue destroyer

Genome clues to amoebic dysentery

Each year, there are an estimated 50 million cases of amoebic dysentery, causing up to 100,000 deaths, mostly in developing countries. On Thursday 24 February 2005, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their colleagues reported in Nature magazine the genome sequence of the parasite that causes the disease, Entamoeba histolytica.

COSMIC First Anniversary

COSMIC First Anniversary

Milestone for Cancer Mutation Catalogue

The COSMIC (Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer) database is one year old on Friday 4 February 2005. COSMIC aims to be a definitive source of information about somatic mutations in cancer.

International HapMap Consortium Releases All Data to the Public

International HapMap Consortium Releases All Data to the Public

HapMap Will Help Identify Genetic Contributions to Disease

The International HapMap Consortium announced today (10th December 2004) at a meeting in Tokyo that all its data will be available without any restrictions, following its success in production of raw data for the Project. The Consortium has removed a defensive mechanism known as a 'click-wrap' license designed to prevent others restricting access to this valuable information.

Genomic Bookmarks Uncovered

Genomic Bookmarks Uncovered

First Chapter of Human Epigenome Project

Somewhere, we all have a textbook from school with pencilled notes in the margin which tell us which bits should be remembered and which bits we can forget. Sometimes, we change our minds and erase the notes, or add new ones. Our friends make different notes and remember different key passages.

Top Award to Sanger Scientist

Top Award to Sanger Scientist

Lord Lloyd of Kilgerran Award Lecture

Dr Richard Durbin delivered the Lord Lloyd of Kilgerran Award Lecture on 26 October 2004. The Award is made each year to "a person who has applied science and technology for the benefit of society." Previous recipients include Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the "father of the internet", James Dyson, the inventor of the cyclone vacuum cleaner, and Tim Smit, the Chief Executive of the Eden Project.

The finished human genome

The finished human genome

The "Gold Standard" sequence

The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, of which the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a major partner, today published their scientific analysis of the finished human genome, the Gold Standard sequence that is already acting to prime new biomedical research.

A Switch for Lung Cancer

A Switch for Lung Cancer

Gene Mutation suggests Targeted Treatments

One in five people in the developed world will die of the diseases we call cancer. What they die of is not one disease, but a bewildering array of cancers, each of which behaves differently, grows differently and - crucially - responds to treatment differently.

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