Creating exhibitions & events

You can engage directly with Sanger science and scientists at exhibitions and events hosted on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton and at centres across the UK. In collaboration with expert designers, we create interactive exhibits that tease out the mysteries of genomics, get you talking about science and illustrate how research leads to revolutions in healthcare.

In recent years, we have co-created major exhibitions, installations and events exploring DNA, the molecule of life.

 Top: Visitors to the exhibition talk with Sanger Institute scientists. Bottom: The central ethics section of Beyond the Genome

Top: Visitors to the exhibition talk with Sanger Institute scientists. Bottom: The central ethics section of Beyond the Genome

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Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition

In the summer of 2013 we exhibited at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition. Our exhibit, Beyond the Genome, took visitors through time from the dawn of DNA sequencing in the 1970s to today's sequencing technologies. The stand showed how we are using DNA sequencing at the Sanger Institute to improve our understanding of genomes. It gave visitors an opportunity to speak with scientists from the Institute and contained a series of interactive games and hands-on activities.

The centre of the stand encouraged visitors to reflect on and discuss the social and ethical issues of whole genome sequencing. A lot of visitors seemed curious to find out what secrets might be locked away in their genomes regarding their ancestry and future health, while others were a little more cautious. We had some interesting discussions and ran a parallel debate at the Genome: Unlocking Life's Code exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

The exhibit is currently being relocated to the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, where it will be housed from the beginning of August.

For more information about the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition and our exhibit, Beyond the Genome, please follow the links in the Related links box to the right.


Visitors to the InsideDNA travelling exhibition.

Visitors to the InsideDNA travelling exhibition.

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Inside DNA

Inside DNA is an exhibition that offers you the chance to explore the role of genetics in health, identity and ancestry. How related are we to our ape cousins? What makes us all human? Is our health predetermined by our genes? Find answers to these questions and more at the Inside DNA exhibition and website.

Inside DNA has been developed by At-Bristol on behalf of Ecsite-UK with funding from the Wellcome Trust and support from the Sanger Institute. It has travelled around science centres in the UK.



 Cambridge Science Festival

Cambridge Science Festival

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Cambridge Science Festival

The Cambridge Science Festival is the largest free science festival in the UK. Every year in the Biology Zone our scientists inspire festival-goers from 6 to 96 years old with hands-on activities featuring Sanger science. Try your hands at creating your own DNA origami and DNA sequence bracelets. All our activities are available online at yourgenome.org.

In 2013 we hosted evening events that enabled our scientists to meet and chat with festival-goers about their research. At Genomes on a grand scale, Sanger Institute faculty members Matt Hurles and Paul Flicek talked about their research comparing thousands of human genomes and epigenomes to understand human variation and the genetics behind human disease.

We also explored the world of malaria with artist Deborah Robinson. The fascinating line up of speakers included Sanger Institute faculty member and malaria researcher Julian Rayner, and medical historian Mary Dobson. They discussed their experiences of malaria and working with Deborah during her artist residency exploring malaria research at the Sanger Institute.



 BRCA2 Cycle Path

BRCA2 Cycle Path

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BRCA2 cycle path

On the cycling and walking link between the Addenbrooke's Hospital and Great Shelford in Cambridge there are 10,000 coloured stripes. These stripes represent the DNA sequence of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2, one of the first genes to be linked to cancer. We worked with Sustrans to develop the colourful design on the path as well as the information panels and DNA sculptures at each end. You can cycle or walk the 1.6 miles yourself!

If you have a project that relates to genetic/genomic science and would like us to help you make it a reality, email pubengage@sanger.ac.uk

Contact

The Franklin Centre for Public Engagement
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute,
Wellcome Trust Genome Campus,
Hinxton,
Cambridgeshire.
CB10 1SA

Phone: +44(0)1223 496995
Fax: +44(0)1223 494919

Email: pubengage@sanger.ac.uk

Please download an overview of the Public Engagement programme.

* quick link - http://q.sanger.ac.uk/fcsr29tj